Where The American Dreamers Work

You’d be hard pressed to say it was a thriving Main Street, but the barbershop, Mexican restaurant, pizza place, tobacco store, mini-mart and even the closed-looking gift store are all open on the short span of Atlantic City’s Ventnor Ave, between Harrisburg and Trenton. In an age of dying malls and online shopping, something is working here.

Breathe, It’s After School

Laurie Egrie is walking down the hallway of Sovereign Avenue School carrying a cardboard box filled with odd little balls and popsicle sticks with notelets stuck to them, and she’s wedged an easel-sized writing pad under one arm. The corridor is half dark. School let out 15 minutes ago.

Who Are You Calling a Contractor? – Tuesday’s Roundup

eorge Norcross has lawyered up – or his company, Conner Strong & Buckelew has – to tell us all that the task force investigating recent EDA credits and grants (many of which went to Norcross-related companies) was “unlawfully constituted” the Inquirer reports. NJ Spotlight reports the lawyers also say the process is “tainted” and political retribution.

Autism Rates, Recovery Coaches, Wrongful Convictions – Friday’s Roundup

Autism Rates A report published by the Centers for Disease Control said one out of every 23 4-year-old boys in New Jersey is diagnosed with autism, and New Jersey preschool children have the highest autism rates ever recorded in the U.S . The study looked at autism rates across seven states. Recovery Coaches The Press has a cool story about a group of recovery coaches who are working to “fill in the gaps of substance abuse treatment and outreach” in Atlantic City, as Colt Shaw puts it. The Recovery Force of Atlantic County is looking to get office space above St. Mike’s Church.

Casino Workers, Wawa Day – Thursday’s Roundup

Local 54 head Bob McDevitt went before the Casino Control Commission yesterday to talk about the hedge funds and private equity funds that have been buying up big stakes in casino companies, and every other company in god’s green America for that matter, and the threat they pose to local wage-earners.

Unpopular Politicians, Bike Paths etc. – Wednesday’s Roundup

Matt Friedman at Politico has an amazing story on “phantom candidates” in Camden County, an old practice where people who aren’t interested in holding office filed to run for election just to make the ballot more confusing and protect incumbents, in this case the Norcross Dem machine.

Bruce Deifik, George Gilmore, Greyhound Tickets – Tuesday’s Roundup

Everybody reports the news that Bruce Deifik, the former owner of the casino formerly known as the Revel, died in a car crash in Denver on Sunday.

Deifik bought the casino in early 2018 but lost it to a hedge fund this year. He was scheduled to go before casino regulators tomorrow over allegations of sexual harassment from employees at the casino, Amy Rosenberg reports.

Here’s How to get Discounted Greyhound Tickets – For Now

It is still possible to buy discounted tickets to Atlantic City from the Port Authority bus terminal in New York. But you have to know where to look. Greyhound ended its discounted first-come, first-served policy for the Atlantic City-New York route on April 1. Now tourists and commuters using Greyhound buses have to buy tickets for specific departure times and dates, and the minimum cost of a round trip between the Port Authority and the Atlantic City bus terminal is $26. It is, however, still possible to get a discounted ticket if you select a specific casino to travel to and from.

Stockton, Speed Limits, Space Team! – Wednesday’s Roundup

Claire Lowe at the Press has fun details on Stockton’s expansion plans in Atlantic City, which include converting the old Eldridge building into dorms to create a true university feel.

I live in the neighborhood and it doesn’t feel too university-ish now, for what it’s worth. I mean I’ve yet to see a professor in a bow-tie, or a flying Model T go warbling and gurgling overhead, which is what I’d been trained to expect university life to look like from the movies. But it’s early days.

Opioids, Beachfront Housing and the City of Tomorrow – Tuesday’s Roundup

The state Medicaid program removed prior-authorization requirements for “medication-assisted treatment” for opioid addiction, everyone reports. “When someone with an opioid addiction is ready for treatment, we shouldn’t be losing them to care while they wait for approval,” the Human Services Commissioner, Carole Johnson, said.