NJEA Money, Revel Beach – Wednesday’s Roundup

A significant chunk of the $5.7 million spent on the past election by the NJEA’s Garden State Forward super PAC came from membership dues. “Many members were under the impression that the money spent on the race was only from voluntary donations,” found NJTV’s Leah Mishkin.

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Pharmaceutical Probe, Guns, Sports Gaming Cos – Tuesday’s Roundup

A pharmaceutical sales representative from Galloway on Monday became the 11th person to plead guilty in an ongoing investigation into health insurance fraud in South Jersey. Most of the guilty pleas so far have come from pharmaceutical reps and other people who are not public employees, as Amy Rosenberg reports for The Inquirer. The investigation, however, hinges around millions of dollars in prescriptions that were written for teachers, police and firemen in and around this area, according to documents released by the U.S. attorney’s office for the district of New Jersey.

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Pinelands Firebreaks, AC Mayor, Galloway Meetinghouse, Atlantic County Shakeup? – Monday’s Roundup

There are miles and miles of wide (more than six feet) firebreaks in the pinelands, often built and maintained by local residents, as well as paid contractors. But the Pinelands Commission is considering a change to its Comprehensive Management Plan that would require a permit for the construction and maintenance of any firebreak wider than six feet.

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AC Ballots, More Election Money – Tuesday’s Roundup

uperior Court Judge Julio Mendez on  Monday denied a request by Atlantic City Mayor Don Guardian’s campaign to be present when the county’s 6,100 vote-by-mail ballots are reviewed by staff of the Board of Elections, reports Amy Rosenberg for The Inquirer. The campaign had wanted to challenge ballots it contends were improperly submitted – but Mendez did set some particular requirements on the election board to safeguard mail-in ballot documentation.

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Nucky Would Be Proud, Voter Turnout, CHIP – Monday’s Roundup

If you read one review of the Atlantic City and County election campaign shenanigans this season, make it this one by The Inquirer’s Amy Rosenberg: Why Atlantic City-area elections this year would make Nucky Johnson Proud. (Separately, we’re following up our weekend look at financial contributions to the NJ 2nd district’s campaigns with a look at expenditures and in-kind contributions. Stay tuned.)

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Following The Money, Buy A Bar, Pot Policy – Friday’s Roundup

NJSpotlight has an interactive map so you can see how much your neighbors have contributed toward the gubernatorial race this year. Meanwhile, in other election-money news, there were allegations of voter fraud at the Atlantic County Board of Elections last night, and you can read more about that via The Press of Atlantic City.

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Trump Plaza, Ballot Questions, Brainstorming AC – Thursday’s Roundup

Trump Plaza will most likely be demolished, and although that’s something a lot of people have been saying for a while, NJ Advance spoke to Dale Finch in Atlantic City’s planning department and learned they are clearing out the interior. The question is what will happen to the land and whether Carl Icahn will sell it after demolition?

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Campaign $$$, Hard Rock $$$, Pipeline State- Wednesday’s Roundup

The Inquirer’s Amy Rosenberg rode along with some private investigators hired by Atlantic City Mayor Don Guardian’s campaign to look into the use of messenger ballots by Democrats in the city. The investigators found at least one person received $30 for signing for a messenger ballot in the name of a stranger and – instead of handing the ballot over to the named stranger (as required by law) – the person handed it over to Atlantic City Democratic activist Craig Callaway.

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Voting Block, Tax Assessments – Monday’s Roundup

Atlantic County mayors are creeping closer to figuring out how to establish a county-wide tax assessment system that they believe could cut down on tax appeals. A bipartisan committee of mayors has been looking at how other tax assessment systems work elsewhere (as far afield as Florida and Arizona) and how the county’s patchwork of municipalities could be brought under one property tax regime.

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